Settings Today

Here’s where the parties stand on the big issue they’re not talking about: climate change

Young voters have consistently expressed concern for the environment, nature, and climate change in various surveys and studies. According to a 2020 study by the Pew Research Center, 69% of adults aged 18-29 in the United States say protecting the environment is a priority for them, compared to 57% of adults overall. Similarly, a 2019 survey by the European Commission found that 82% of Europeans aged 18-29 consider climate change a very or somewhat important issue for their vote in European elections.

The importance of environmental issues among young voters is reflected in their political activism as well. The Sunrise Movement, a youth-led organization advocating for political action on climate change, gained significant attention in 2018 when it disrupted Nancy Pelosi's office to demand action on the Green New Deal. In 2019, Greta Thunberg, a 16-year-old Swedish activist, led a global movement of student strikes demanding action on climate change.

Despite the clear interest and activism of young voters on environmental issues, some politicians have been criticized for not addressing these concerns sufficiently during the 2020 general election campaign in the United States. According to a study by the Yale Program on Climate Communication, only 13% of campaign speeches mentioned climate change in the first three presidential debates.

The lack of discussion on climate change and environmental issues during the campaign is concerning given the urgency of the situation. The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has warned that limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels will require rapid and far-reaching transitions in energy, land, urban, and infrastructure systems. The IPCC also emphasizes that such transitions will require strong political will and significant public support.

Young voters have the power to make a difference in this regard. According to a study by the Center for Information & Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE), young people who vote have a higher turnout rate than those who don't. In the 2018 midterm elections in the United States, for example, 31% of eligible 18-29-year-olds voted, compared to 49% of eligible adults overall. By making their voices heard at the ballot box, young voters can influence political decisions that will impact the future of the planet.

In conclusion, nature, the environment, and climate change are important issues for young voters, and their activism on these topics has been growing in recent years. However, some politicians have been criticized for not addressing these concerns sufficiently during the 2020 general election campaign in the United States. The urgency of the situation requires strong political will and significant public support, which can be influenced by young voters through their participation in elections.


Published 18 days ago

Go Back to Reading NewsBack Read News Collect this News Article

© 2024 - ErnesTech - Privacy
E-Commerce Return Policy